• HAEMATINICS


    A Division Of Puneet Group of Companies
    Haematinics as Nutritional Supplements

Iron Absorption

Iron absorption is affected by the form in which iron is presented to the digestive tract , and inorganic iron ions change oxidation state during the absorption process.


There are two major forms of dietary iron : Haem Iron (Organic Iron)- Red Meat , To Lesser Extent from Chicken and Fish Non-Haem (Inorganic Iron) - Whole meal bread, Cereals, Rice, Broccoli , Beans, Raga, Spinach. Haem Iron is found primarily in red meats, in the most easily absorbable form. Other forms of iron are bound to some other organic constituent of the food. Cooking tends to break these interactions and increase iron availability.


Iron Ions undergo two important changes of oxidation state during digestion and absorption. The First change occurs in the stomach, Here iron Fe(III) is reduced to Iron Fe(II). This reduction is favored by the low pH. Reducing agents such as ascorbic acid assist this process. Reduction is important because Iron (II) disassociates from ligands more easily than Iron (III). The second change occurs in the duodenum. The duodenum is bicarbonate-rich, and alkaline. In the alkaline environment heme is absorbed directly by the mucosal cells. Within the cells the iron disassociates from it. Free Iron (II) ions are oxidised to iron (III), which is taken up by the mucosal cells in substantial amounts under all circumstances of nutritional iron status.




Iron absorption is affected by the form in which iron is presented to the digestive tract , and inorganic iron ions change oxidation state during the absorption process.


There are two major forms of dietary iron : Haem Iron (Organic Iron)- Red Meat , To Lesser Extent from Chicken and Fish Non-Haem (Inorganic Iron) - Whole meal bread, Cereals, Rice, Broccoli , Beans, Raga, Spinach. Haem Iron is found primarily in red meats, in the most easily absorbable form. Other forms of iron are bound to some other organic constituent of the food. Cooking tends to break these interactions and increase iron availability.


The Majority of the body's Iron is found in the hemoglobin of developing and mature red blood cells. Of the remaining iron, a significant portion is stored in the liver , both in the hepatocytes and in the Kupffer cells, a type of macrophage found in the liver. Kupffer cells play an important role in recycling body iron. The ingest aged red blood cells, releasing iron for re-use by breaking down hemoglobin. The small amount of iron that is lost each day (about 1-2 mg) is matched by dietary absorption of iron.


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